Recently, I came across the butterchurn JavaScript library, which brings the classic Milkdrop music visualizer to WebGL. I’d also been talking to a friend about his recently released album, and wondered if I could figure out how to render a video of Milkdrop to a track from the album and upload it to YouTube.

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As a developer, I’m often working on the command line. Last year, a friend at work introduced me to a terminal utility called tmux, and it’s quickly become one of my favorite tools.

If you’re not familiar with tmux, it’s a program that makes managing multiple terminal sessions much easier. Instead of having a bunch of terminal windows that get lost in the mess of everything else you have open, you just have one terminal window open that can quickly access multiple prompts. You work with different prompts by using keyboard commands to configure and jump between tmux sessions, windows, and panes. A tmux session needs at least one window, but the number of panes you divide each window into is up to you. If you frequently run the same set of commands to start your development environment, you can script tmux to create a new session that automatically divides your terminal the way you like it and runs the appropriate commands. I’m barely scratching the surface here — if you’re not familiar with tmux and you spend a decent amount of time at the command line, I recommend giving it a shot. I got started with (and am still using) Oh My Tmux!, but there are a ton of other resources on the web.

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A friend came to me with a request to make a music box as a gift for her fiance. The music box would need to play a specific track, “Let’s Dance,” an M. Ward cover of a David Bowie song.

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An LED placed at each of the fifty state capitals updates its color every 20 minutes over the internet to reflect the current temperature in that city. The legend on the right side indicates what temperature each color corresponds to.

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My sister and her husband recently bought their first house, and I decided to make them a wooden address sign to go in the front yard. My considerations were to keep the design simple while matching its intended rustic setting and be as legible as possible, including at night. With these concerns in mind, I decided on a double-sided wooden sign, with the lettering consisting of contrasting inlay. I was interested in getting more exposure with the Trotec laser cutter at NextFab, and this provided the perfect opportunity. The sign is constructed from black walnut and maple, with a plywood core.

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